Fitness Special—Hike Forever: Age 65 & Up – Backpacker

I’m reblogging today’s Twitter feed from Backpacker magazine.  Granted, it might have a bit limited an appeal, given that it targets us greying hikers.  While I agree with the majority of the points covered, the article contains one glaring piece of medical misinformation, bad advice that should probably be edited out.

It has to do with point E:

Joints/cartilage/back Wear-and-tear decreases padding in the joints and back, leading to stiffness and pain when hiking. The fix: “Moving a joint loosens it,” Lynn Millar says. At home, guide stiff joints through their full range of motion (arm swings for shoulders; squats for knees) 5 times per day. On the trail, repeat movements in the morning, at rest breaks, and in the evening. Pop 400 milligrams of anti-inflammatories 3 times per day.

I’m not going to Pop 400 milligrams of anti-inflammatories 3 times per day !

I didn’t swill Ibuprofen last June while hiking a month in Portugal, and I didn’t down bottles of the stuff on my 2013 CDT thru-hike.  Even though I have a history of  inflammation that eventually resulted in surgery on both my knees for cartilage tears, and have undergone two shoulder surgeries for arthritis, bursitis, and tendonitis I rarely dose my discomfort with anti-inflammatories.

If you Google for side effects of anti-inflammatories, you will get specific warnings to be prudent about the use of “Vitamin I”, as it is erroneously dubbed by long distance hikers.

Here a quick read from Outside magazine (2014):  The Cure for Sore Muscles? More Movement.Throw away your ice packs and ibuprofen if you want to recover right.

In the past three years, there has been increasing evidence of the real damage that can be done with overuse of ibuprofen.  From Outside: “Chronic ibuprofen users have some cell damage in their intestines, especially their colon,” says Dr. David Nieman, a professor of health and exercise science at Appalachian State University and author of several studies on ibuprofen use in endurance athletes. “That allows bacteria to escape in small amounts into the blood stream,” augmenting the inflammatory response.

Source: Fitness Special—Hike Forever: Age 65 & Up – Backpacker:

About tjamrog

I'm sixty-seven and live in the Maine woods. I thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail in 2007, the Pacific Crest Trail in 2010, Vermont's Long Trail in 2011, and the Continental Divide Trail in 2013 . I am outdoors every day. I offer guided backpacking trips and classes in Maine, through "Uncle Tom's Guided Adventures".
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