When a Mile and a Half is Enough

My Ice Cream Truck is back from the bike shop.  The big, black, two-wheeled tractor has suited me well on the 10 mile loop that I put together for myself on this Patriot’s Day holiday here in Maine.
The bike went to the shop after my 4.7” 45N Dunderbeist rear tire sported a two inch tear right along the rim line last Thursday night on Ragged Mountain.  It wasn’t my fault. The tire had 161 miles on it.

This

This

I hit nothing that tore it.  It just failed.  Luckily I was not running tubeless. I was sporting a minor bulge, due to the 6 pounds of pressure I had in the tube.
My upgraded tire is the improved version of the Dunderbeist, with the same grippy tread pattern as before, along with additional interior layers of fabric that were added to the sidewall. Under warranty for the next two years, there was also no charge for mounting either.  Thanks, Sidecountry Sports, and 45North for the quick service.   I am ready to roll again.

I continue to be interested in backpacking, hiking, and riding my bike close to home. Since I  have read Microadventures, I have experienced increasing satisfaction in my outdoor recreational activities. I have also been outside almost every day.  The radius of my path today was just a mile and a half, yet it took me thirty-nine years to discover two distinct segments of today’s ride. Yes, I have mountain bike trails from right out my door. I have NEVER seen anyone else riding this loop other than when I  meet up with snowmobile riders, but that might not ever happen some winters.

Here’s one of the views on this ride, this one not 10 minutes ride from my driveway.

Hidden pond

Hidden pond

On the abandoned Martin Corner Road, there are often these large waterholes that linger after any hard rain. Martin  My riding pal Andy Hazen rides though here often. He tells a story about escaping the jaws of a snapping turtle that was hanging out in one of these pools a couple of years ago.

After ascending the steep section of Moody Mountain Road, the middle of this ride is along and around the French Road that runs north along the back side of Moody Mountain toward Levensellar Pond.  This loop is the product of decades of my clearing and connecting the old snowmobile trails.

Here are a couple of shots of an old woods road that loops off the French Road.

Pretty clean

Pretty clean

Headed out

A blow down blocks the trail ahead, where I have cut a go-around that hardly visible to the unschooled eye.

Make no mistake, this loop requires at least two and a half miles of climbing.  After the ascent up to the high point on Moody Mountain Road, the climbing continues along a woods road that almost reaches the ridge above High Street.

One more climb off the Muzzy Ridge Road leads to  a huge blueberry expanse that comes with a view of the Atlantic beyond. FullSizeRender 11

The end of the ride includes three miles of descent, part of which is freshly maintained snowmobile trail that leads off the blueberry field, where it twists and turns its way back down to High Street and then back to my house.  I have been hiking it for a few times before today. This is the first time that I have ridden this segment.  Unfortunately, a new blow down really needs a chain saw to clear it out.  I plan to bring along a small hand saw next time to clear a route around the blow down.

Sometimes, going around is better than forging ahead.

selfie

Thank you,  Strava.

screenshot 2

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About tjamrog

I'm sixty-seven and live in the Maine woods. I thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail in 2007, the Pacific Crest Trail in 2010, Vermont's Long Trail in 2011, and the Continental Divide Trail in 2013 . I am outdoors every day. I offer guided backpacking trips and classes in Maine, through "Uncle Tom's Guided Adventures".
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5 Responses to When a Mile and a Half is Enough

  1. jorysquibb says:

    thanks tom….i’d like to bike this with you, when it dries out (gary fisher mtn bike.)….jory

    • tjamrog says:

      Totally welcome to join me. The woods are drier now than usually is the case in early May. About a month ahead. Did Brenda tell you we ran into her at Camden Hills last week?

  2. Rockdawg69 says:

    ” a large waterhole” huh? “waterhole” implies a place where humans and other animals can get a drink of water. Down here we would call it a “mudhole” and dive right in. Nothing better than a good mud wallow for the soul!!!!!! Go through at a high rate of speed and enjoy the “splash”!
    Best to you and your rides. Spring is here and more “mud” is coming.
    Porter

    • tjamrog says:

      OK, Rockdawg, it is a mudhole. You are correct. Auntie Mame and I are going to hike 250 miles on the Camino Portugese for a month this June. This is a big deal!

      • Rockdawg69 says:

        Messing with you UT.
        Wow! What a trip. Hope y’all have a great time.
        Had fusion of 2 vertebrae in early Jan this year. Looking good so far. If all goes well with family issues (my mom), I’ll start AT at Pallisades Pwky in mid May and head toward Katahdin. I figure about 81/82 days at my pace. Have to be home by Aug 1 for birth of our 1st grand child, so that is cutting it close on hiking days. Probably will be able to speed up after first 3 or 4 weeks to make up time and get done ahead of schedule.

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