Running 5 Minutes a Day Has Long-Lasting Benefits

Running 5 Minutes a Day Has Long-Lasting Benefits<—from the NY Times

photo from iStock

photo from iStock

I’m a total convert to brisk walking.  In terms of evolution, walking is what got us to where we are today.  For a very interesting summer read, I’d recommend hitting the library and check out  “The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health, and Disease” by Daniel E. Lieberman. liebermanbook Lieberman writes  that when we eventually stood up some millions of years ago, we could finally use our hands to reach for fruit on trees, and when we became more adept at walking, we were able to pursue living food sources, and in some cases escape larger predators that saw us as their next meal.

Walking, and it’s biomechanical sibling- running, may well be the key to your own personal longevity right now.

How long has it been since you have pushed your body hard, stressing your legs muscles and joints?  I don’t run anymore.  I tried that when I was in my 20’s and ended up with the frayed and torn cartilage being removed from both knees. Big heavy guys like me shouldn’t be training for marathons, or triathlons.

I then took up bicycling and am still at it, and enjoying it more than ever, but I’m fearful of the growing texting-as-you-drive phenomenon and try to stay off the roads and keep to the woods on my bikes. I don’t want to be taken out by a drifting, inattentive, possibly impaired driver.

The NY Times ran this most interesting article this past week, one that I’ve re-read three times to get it right.  It’s about the marked benefit of very brief running, like 5 minutes.  I like the NY Times health/fitness reporting, because the writing is science-based. They are wary of putting out fluff, and they have the people power to fact check most articles they publish.

This is a huge sample. The Times reports:  “..55,137 healthy men and women ages 18 to 100 who had visited a clinic at least 15 years before the start of the study. Of this group, 24 percent identified themselves as runners, although their typical mileage and pace varied widely. The researchers then checked death records for these adults. In the intervening 15 or so years, almost 3,500 had died, many from heart disease.”

On the surface it seems to good to be true, but I think there’s something for sure to be gained from ramping up one’s own activity level.  It’s not nuts.  What this appears to be is a very brief snapshot of Interval Training, or workout intensity bursts.

Five minutes of increased physical activity is definitely going to hurt, but only for a little while.  This could be a very good fitness deal  (Of course, you have to be cleared by your doctor for this level of intensity)!

I’m in!

Comments?

 

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About tjamrog

I'm sixty-seven and live in the Maine woods. I thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail in 2007, the Pacific Crest Trail in 2010, Vermont's Long Trail in 2011, and the Continental Divide Trail in 2013 . I am outdoors every day. I offer guided backpacking trips and classes in Maine, through "Uncle Tom's Guided Adventures".
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