Snowshoeing the Loneliest Trail in Camden

Craig Nelson and I just spent a chilly two and a half hours crunching out a five miler in the Camden Hills.  Here is a link to the map of this hike.

I consider the Frohock Mountain trail the loneliest in the Park, because it just doesn’t connect to anything- it’s out and back,  and the summit (at least in the warm weather ) doesn’t have a view, it is leafed in.

Standing on the lonley summit

During this time of year, the leaf drop allows one to look out to the east to see glimpses of the Bay, and to glance west brings views of the ridges of Lincolnville/Searsmont in the distance.  We had our boil up, as usual.

Nelson boiling up

I feel it is excellent practice to ignite wood, or even alcohol stove fires in the windy sub freezing temperatures.

Even though it was below 20 degrees and breezy out, my clothing selection was adequate.  I had on for skin base a ultra-thin Ibex wool short sleeve t-shirt, covered by a wool blend long sleeve Trek bicycling shirt.  I like the bike shirt in the cold because it affords a double layer of fabric over the kidney area.  My outer layer was my Patagonia Houdini shell. The Ibex wool gloves I had on were inadequate.  My hands were painfully cold.  I have yet to figure out an acceptable hand cover for when I am using my hiking poles. Wrist straps complicate things.  I think it should be shelled mittens with inner liners.

Later, at home, after rising from the couch, I experienced a terribly painful episode where both my thighs cramped up , a seriously uncomfortable bout of pain that had he shrieking like a baby.  I would very much like to understand what I have to do to prevent this type of reaction after a day of harder than average leg exertion.  Any good ideas?

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About tjamrog

I'm sixty-seven and live in the Maine woods. I thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail in 2007, the Pacific Crest Trail in 2010, Vermont's Long Trail in 2011, and the Continental Divide Trail in 2013 . I am outdoors every day. I offer guided backpacking trips and classes in Maine, through "Uncle Tom's Guided Adventures".
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2 Responses to Snowshoeing the Loneliest Trail in Camden

  1. The usual response to your query would be to make sure you are well-hydrated. For me, when I hiked my small epic in 2010, I found that even when I drank constantly during the day, I needed to continue to re-tank in the evening and overnight. In the cold, you may think you don’t need to do so because you can layer up or layer down to minimize sweating, but I think this can still be a problem.

    You are in a low risk group for vascular disease as a cause, I think. You never smoked, you are in fine cardiovascular shape. If it were vascular disease, it would affect the toes and fingers first

    I enjoy reading these. It’s been a typical winter in Hawaii – I suppose you don’t wanna hear it. I am walking every day, again. I am seriously thinking of another A.T., Springer NoBo, this summer. My nephew in TX gets married June 3rd; I can afford to attend the wedding OR go to Nepal, but not both.

    Looked at my YouTube channel lately? There’s a 24 minute video recorded by a pro, located there of which I am proud…….

    Joe

    I miss the H.M.O.

  2. Re: leg cramps; in my former soccer glory days, we were told to have plenty of salt in our foods so that we cramp up less. Turns out salt loss is a main cause of cramping! If you’re sweating a lot during the hikes, it may be a key.
    http://hikingscience.blogspot.com/2010/12/salt-and-cramp-tips.html

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