Thru-hiking Baxter State Park – Day 1 of 7

3.3 miles

IMG_3417.JPGI welcomed myself back to Baxter State Park today. It’s been two years since I’ve been to this most unique setting. Katahdin’s fantastic granite glacial cirque is set within in a 200,000 acre public state park that is run with a management style that has been strictly preservationist. Decades old man-made structures are generally razed rather than replaced. Here is one place on earth that graces wilderness, showcasing it quietly.

Despite my friend Chris and I rendezvoused at Guthook’s house at 6 AM, we weren’t able to reach the Roaring Brook Campground until 2 PM. This trip involved a lot of driving. Guthook and I drove both our cars all the way up to Exit 264 on Maine’s I-95 and then wound our way through the backwoods hardscrabble of Patten, a tiny berg that is slowly being populated by Mennonites.

We eventually passed through the northern Matagannon gate of Baxter and spotted my Caravan in the parking lot at South Branch Pond Campground, where we each have stashed three breakfasts, lunches, and dinners, as well as any snacks that we’d need for our last several days in the infrequently visited northeast corner of the Park. Then Guthhook and I got into his Jetta and he proceeded to drive us some 47 miles, and mostly obeying the 20 MPH speed limit on the Park Tote Road to the southern gate and then twelve more miles northeast to Roaring Brook Campground.
The trail from the parking lot to Chimney Pond Campground is not flat. I remembered it as very gradually going up for the whole 3.3 miles. It’s REALLY not flat, ascending 1,500 feet in that distance, most of the rise coming in the middle mile. It’s a pretty tough right out of the parking lot, especially with a sack full of gear and food in your back.
I am still stunned at the granite studded footpath, one interspersed with roots of all textures, depths, and angles that are criss-crossing the trail.
Our reservations tonight are in the Bunkhouse, which holds twelve. It’s functional, with an enclosed outer hallway with one common room that has a picnic table off to one side, a stainless steel clad cooking surface along one wall, and a big honking airtight wood stove in the center of the room. When I arrived at 2 PM, the place was loaded up with about 10 people, some playing cards at the table in 2 groups, and others laying around on the bunks chatting and sleeping. In a little while another group of 3 newcomers came in, along with even more people. It got really noisy. I wanted to claim a bottom bunk and just lay out for a while. That’s when I learned that most of this crowd had slept there the night before and had remained through the next afternoon. They were in no mood for giving us the spaces we had reserved four months ago. I had to ask a vacant teenage girl to please move her self and her gear so that I could set up my slotted space. It took a couple of hours for them to clear out, and then things became much more enjoyable.
A young bilingual couple from Quebec, a three generation set of males from Benton, Maine, and a father and his son rounded out the evening’s other occupants. The place was quite dark, but had a couple of propane lights that illuminated and also heated the room a bit.
It was an early night.
Tomorrow we hike Katahdin. I am always nervous about how I will do. Could also be a Knife Edge day.

Guthook’s own blog entry for this day is here

Thru-Hiking Baxter State Park (2014 version)

Me on the Summit of Baxter (2009)

Me on the Summit of Baxter (2009)

My long-awaited week at Maine’s Baxter State is almost here.  Here is the itinerary that I just sent the three folks on this adventure. At the time I reserved my route, three months ago, Chimney Pond Campground was already sold out for Monday with space for just 2.  Chimney is the pick of the litter as far as BSP campgrounds go, even though it is a 3.3 mile hike from your vehicle.

Day 1 Roaring Brook parking lot to Chimney Pond Campground (CPC)     3.3 miles
( Guthook and Uncle Tom have the last Bunkhouse slots )

Day 2 Summit Day for Katahdin   (staying in Lean-to #02)       route undetermined
( Chris could hike in 3.3 miles to Chimney Pond Lean-to for his 1st day)

Day 3  CPC—>Roaring Brook—>Russell Pond CG  (lean-to #05)         10 miles
(Chris could also meet up at RB parking lot for his first day and have 6.5 miles for this day)

Day 4  RPCG—> Upper South Branch Lean To- via Pogy Notch Trail                9.5 miles

Day 5 USBP Lean-to to South Branch Campground Lean to # 02         12 miles (via Traveler Mountain Loop) – (lower mileage and much less demanding options are 2.1 on east side of SB Pond or 4.7 miles on the west side of the Pond)

Day 6 SBCG to Long Pond Pines tent site                    7.5 Miles

Day 7 Hike out from tent site back to a car ( back the 7.5 miles ) at South Branch Campground and then drive to Nesowadnehunk Field Campground (NFCG) for Lean-to #7  – We planned to summit Doubletop ( 6.8 miles round trip) either this day, or sleep at NFCG this day OR

Day 8   Double Top Mtn. in the morning with no gear in a day pack (6.8 miles round trip) and drive home this day  .

Chris,

all the maps for this itinerary are downloadable on the Baxter State Park Web site- if you have the ability to print them out, you should do it and have your own map(s)- alternatively you can purchase a nice Delorme waterproof map of BSP for about $9,  or a MUCH better deal is to purchase a copy of the revised (2012)  AMC  Maine Mountain Guide for $24, which will give you great reading about all these trails . You’ll also have the 100 Mile Wilderness map for our upcoming September fly-in trip on The Hundred.

Here is an excellent description of the rigorous, but rewarding Traveler Loop Trail that I hope to do on Day 5.

All nights except for one will be in a 4 person lean-to.

As of yesterday, there are still mosquitoes in BSP. I am undecided as to how I will deal with them.  If I had a bivvy sack, it would be my first choice.  I may go minimal just bring some Deet and a head net.  Only 1 night will be at a tent site, so I may cowboy that night, or if the weather is iffy, I will have my tent stashed in the car at South Branch Pond campground.  I’ll get that and pack it in to Long Pond Pines tent site.

I will update my packing list and get it to you, Chris.

WHOOOOOO!

Seeking Midcoast Maine’s Tastiest Fried Clam – Week 3

I sampled fried clams this week at two more local Midcoast Maine seafood establishments, both recommended to me by readers: Rockland’s Hills Seafood Company and The Captain’s Fresh Idea in Waldoboro.

Hills Seafood Company: Rigger recommended the seafood, so I went. Hills is a new restaurant taking over at Brick’s former location. It is right across street from the Time-Out Pub and Rockland’s Harbor Park-prime seafood country with the broad blue Penobscot Bay backdrop right across the street. The North Atlantic Blues Festival is here next weekend, where a seat on the outside deck here will put a chorus of “Down to Chicago” front and center with your ocean feast. Mame and I decided to eat on the deck, a prime spot to watch the unique parade of passers-by that tend to frequent this part of town. The fried clam plate at Hills sets you back “ market price,” which was $24 right today. I passed on the fries, opting for the veggie side plus cole slaw.  Twelve clams were tastefully presented on top of a piece of blue and white checkered paper that decorated the plate, looked good, but not so useful this time.

HILLS
The whole belly clams were lightly batter fried, and characteristically chewy-they were good, but the whole experience was not great. Things would have been much better if the steamed broccoli was served in its own little plate, instead of being placed next to my sacred fried clams. I’m not one to slowly savor the glory of the clam-they are best hot, crisp and fresh. The hot water from the broccoli side soaked through to the point where little pieces of colored paper deteriorated and started sticking to my treasured clams. Nope. However, the quick and friendly service helped, as did the Allagash White draft beer. This plate could have been a contender if the side had not leaked into the good stuff.

The Captain’s Fresh Idea:
The Captain’s Fresh Idea, on Route 1 in Waldoboro, has been across from the Wooden Screened Door place since 1987. It looks like a take-out. However, the dining room is super clean and loaded with summer-in-Maine stuff. There is also a screened in deck and a take-out window if you would like to sit outside on one of the picnic tables. Lobster rolls are at the top of the menu. The fried seafood is reported to be hand breaded.
The only fried clams appearing on the menu were a full basket with all the sides. I inquired about other options and learned that they’d make up any amount I wanted-I chose a half-pint with a side of home made cole slaw. It was $14.95 for a single serving of 15 delicious fried clams, with the giant cup of slaw $2.99 more.

20140715-155229-57149074.jpg The service was speedy. The clams were very good, lightly battered, slightly crispy, and hot. The clams here tied for first place with the Red Barn, reviewed in week two. Any coincidence that both establishments sport red metal roofs?

Week 2- Seeking Midcoast’s Maine’s Tastiest Fried Clam

I recently sampled the fried clams at two establishments that were recommended to me by readers: Lincolnville’s Chez Michel and The Red Barn in Augusta.

Chez Michel’s:  I was Father’s Day, with Auntie Mame picking up the bill, so we went to the home-town choice down on Lincolnville Beach.  The clam plate at Chez Michel’s sets you back $25, a bit high for a plate of clams, but with the above average setting, with the view from the upstairs room overlooking the harbor, the price sort of fits.  The offering included a dinner salad with home made parmesan peppercorn dressing, fresh baked french bread, and garlic mashed potatoes.  Fifteen clams showed up too, making a mighty large and attractive plate of seafood-  The clams were batter fried, with a good clam taste-a slightly chewy experience. The tartar sauce cup needed a second replacement.   A decent plate of clams here, and frankly a mound of clams that was indistinguishable from the fried clams that I had at Andy’s Brew Pub at the Lobster Pound last week, where the price was $16 for 11 clams.

A thing of beauty- Chez Michel's clam plate

A thing of beauty- Chez Michel’s clam plate.

The Red Barn:  Since 1977, the Red Barn has been a popular spot on Route 202, above the intersection with Route 3 on Riverside Drive heading out of Augusta.

A very good find

A very good find

I’ve never eaten at the Red Barn but was visiting my friend Lock, so we went there for lunch. We were dismayed by the almost completely filled parking lot at lunchtime on a weekday.  I felt a wait coming on.  However, there was no line when we bellied up to the order counter, where our selections were quickly dispatched, and we were told our names would be called when the food would be ready. I decided to cut to the quick and order just a single serving of clams, accompanied by a side of cole slaw. The clams came out in 5 minutes!  My iPhone’s camera put an unappetizing green cast on the Red Barn’s clam plate, so I don’t have an inviting pic.  I am compelled to taste my fried clams while they are still hot, and from now on, will avoid filling up on and getting derailed by french fries, or any other potato options and focus on just the clam ( and the slaw/salad and the tartar sauce).  I got my recommendation for the Red Barn from Jason, who was adamant that it’s the home-made tartar sauce puts these clams over the top. The tartar sauce may have even had a bit of cumin added, and was bottomless, coming from a large pump dispenser on the condiment counter, which also had a few large pump containers of genuine Heinz ketchup. It’s a plus to have the ability to take enough of one’s own tartar sauce, and a welcome cut above requesting another of those tiny paper cups of tartar sauce that often punctuate one’s fried clam experience. It’s $14.95 for a single serving of clams here, and only $1 more for two servings (a whole pint) of the tasty little devils. The cole slaw set me back another $.75.   OK, now the taste -wow!  It took about two seconds to move these clams right to the top of my admittedly brief list of fried clam favorites-due to the fresh out-of-the-fryolator status, thin batter, light fry, and very smooth clam consistency.  Not much chewing needed here.  Clearly, a superior fried clam.  Highly recommended!  A half-price cone of vanilla soft serve for just $1 also sweetened my ride back home. Yeah!

Conti’s 1894 Restaurant

Hikers love good food, and lots of it and would flip at finding this double-shot combination at “Conti’s 1894 Restaurant” in the working-class south end of Rockland, ME.
My wife ( Auntie Mame)  and sister-in-law (V8) I ate there tonight, a Thursday, when we were one of three parties that entered the restaurant at exactly the same time. Things work differently at Conti’s. Rather than seating us in individual groups as we walked through the door,  the sole waitress stacked us up as one big group while she graced three tables with home made bread, bowls of salad, house Italian salad dressing and place settings. The decor of the single dining room was casual, with the recycled school cafeteria chairs clustered around an array of tables covered with newspaper.
Next the ordering process. There is just one menu here, hand scribbled on a long sheet of newsprint that hangs in front of the dining room.  Penmanship is not Palmer Method-I couldn’t read most of it, but our hostess/waitress led us through the day’s choices-It’s mostly seafood, maybe 10 dishes worth.  I chose haddock with scallops, Marcia had Scottish salmon ( “the good stuff”) and swordfish, and Jan had the haddock.

Next, you decide what sauce comes with your meal:  Al olio ( garlic and olive oil), marina, and then two more gradations of red sauce, each with increasing heat.  All of it comes on pasta, which for the three of us, was dressed with warm olive oil and minced garlic.  That’s it!
Then onto the dining room, where we got one of the three coveted booths on the right wall.  A fresh candle stuck in a wine bottle, was quickly lit, and provided ambience. The bread is crumbly and a bit dry, but it’s something to munch on with the salad while we endured the short wait for our dinners.
Then came wow.
The dinners came to us on fresh-hot-from-the oven 10” glass pie plates, heaped. My cut of the action tonight was sixteen large fresh-schucked scallops, plus about a half a pound of haddock.
Marcia’s slabs of fish were seared and cooked to perfection.

Auntie Mame, salmon, and swordfish

Auntie Mame, salmon, and swordfish

She knows fish and said that the pound of Scottish salmon retailed for $13, and then there was the 1/2 pound of swordfish.  She ate all she could. Her leftovers amounted to 1 pound six ounces (and two additional meals’ worth, which we weighed out when we reached home) of goodness.
Jan had about a pound of haddock-she was a first-timer and was shocked.  IMG_2884
The wine was Woodbridge-but at $6 a glass, and filled to the brim, I didn’t complain. The last time we came here and it was refill time, Marcia asked about the second red wine choice and the waitress brought her a fresh glass full, and even didn’t charge for it, even after we told here she forgot to tally it in.  A variety of bottled beers in the cooler are something you get for yourself.  When the waitress came and checked on us after 5 minutes, she asked if we needed anything else-I asked for some extra olive oil.  She soon returned with a soup bowl full of warm “extra virgin olive oil,” with lots of fresh chopped garlic. I put the big spoon that came with it to use.
You laugh a lot here. What’s not to like?  Crosby, Stills and Nash and classic 70’s rock emanated from the kitchen, where John was back at it, as he is every day, 365 days a year.  Just remember to bring your cash, as there are no credit cards, nor are there any reservations, appetizers, microwave, freezer, or individual menus here.  They have even stopped the desserts.

Be forewarned.  John Conti’s approach to dining may ruin your experience at other local seafood establishments. I was disappointed in the meager fish plate I had at a renown waterfront restaurant in Camden last week, where the same twenty bucks that brought me to satisfaction city here tonight bought me just five scallops and a small piece of haddock.  Camden has the view, but my heart’s right at Conti’s.
The total for the three of us was $83, including the wine, and that bowl of olive oil.

The Others

For the past 36 years I’ve been walking up the driveway to get the Bangor Daily News that gets delivered to me sometime around 5:30 each morning.  Today, like no other day, a majestic bald eagle greeted me-  circling not 50 feet above my head as I reached into the newspaper box up on the road.
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I don’t work on my birthday anymore, and try to let the day unfold a bit before I go hiking.  It’s a tradition that I have started in 2008, on the one year anniversary of starting out walking from Springer Mountain in Georgia to Maine.  I know that the new year is something that is thought to start on January 1, but for me it starts on my birthday, just a few days after the Spring equinox.  The light is brightening now, the days most years are warmer already. It’s time to walk again.
I wanted to backpack at least half the day today, but sometimes we have to improvise.  Improvisation is one of my major lessons this year. The Improv Wisdom book is a big help these days.
Yes, it’s just as good as it ever was- the hiking today. Maybe not as long a walk than I first wanted, but it’s what worked out. I loved the feeling of stretching out my legs, kicking forward, and leaning toward the horizon a bit- saw no one.
The trail ahead is slippery

The trail ahead is slippery

What a privilege it is to have the miles of trails and warm shelter to myself right now. The sun is setting, skies are clear and it’s definitely back into the 20′s tonight.
Just as I was walking, someone sings  “Sorrows are flowing downstream down the mountain”on the iPhone that I’m listening to . I was in the process of taking this photograph at that exact moment- I’m not kidding.

Flowing but mostly frozen

I just set up final details to do a 100 mile hike down on the Appalachian Trail in May to hike into Trail Days. I’ll be in Tennessee,  North Carolina and into Virginia ! I hope hike a few of those miles with Duff, who is setting out on a thru-hike of the AT this season. Plus Guthook will be breezing through at autobahn level mileages as he storms through Virginia as a total act of devotion to updating his ever popular AT Hiker app. Bob Peoples is helping me with logistics, and I’ll be sure to stay at his place- Kincora- the best hostel of the whole AT.

I am hoping see Crazy Horse down there. When he had the Captain America Corvette he was easy to track down. Now his car is nothing flashy.

It’s not that big a bunch that hikes a lot. These people tend to get to events like Trail Days  and AYZPCTKO ( PCT kickoff).   I will likely spot a few folks that I have not thought about in years but, when I do run into them, I’ll be filled with excitement instantly due to some deep connection we made between each other while out there with The Others. That’s who I belong to- the ragtag bunch of backpackers who do not have upward mobility anywhere even close to their home screens.  These noble folks are the masters of forward mobility.

I started hiking north on the AT on my birthday in 2007.  One thing I really enjoy right now is reading my original Trailjournal from that long hike.  I start reading about today on today, just 7 years later.  And over the next few weeks, I wake up and re-read that day’s journal, reliving the past, refreshing my outlook for the coming season.  No thru hikes for me this year, but I am excited about my progress in completing Cary Kish’s “1000 miles of hiking in Maine in one year” challenge.   I put in six more miles today.

 

 

Hiking Clark Island

Clark Island, a little known, private island in St. George, on the rocky coast of Maine, is definitely worth a hike. Pat, John, and I checked it out yesterday, as we dodged and weaved through serious winter wind on our 4 mile loop around the mostly abandoned territory.

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I found few little web details about this hike. We parked at the edge of the causeway, where there was space for just one vehicle. From there we walked straight ahead through the yard of the caretaker’s house and followed the well trodden winter path all the way to the end.
20140302-091431.jpg From there we decided to walk the shoreline rather than double back. The rockweed was slippery and tread uneven, so we were careful not to fall.

20140302-093426.jpg Part way back, we spotted an ancient trail that wound it’s way back over the main (unplowed) road. Here a photo of John beside a couple of balsam furs that have been stripped by what must if been a hungry deer.

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Here’s reference material from a 2002 Courier-Gazette:

“At the end of the causeway is a lone house that stands at the entrance of Clark Island. Beyond it are trails that wind through fields, stately pines and other trees and fragrant wild flowers. In a few places it was evident where deer traipsed through. A few of the trails led me to different granite quarries. Standing on the edge of one of the quarries and looking out and over the tree line I could see the ocean. Large slabs of granite and trees make the quarry secluded and private. Some of the rocks that border the area are a perfect spot to sit for a picnic or to lay back and sunbathe..”
This island is still untouched and has a great deal of history. One side of the island is built up with granite walls that form a pier. In the early 1900s, ships used to dock there and load up on granite that had been cut from the quarry. The operation stopped more than 70 years ago when workers struck water and it filled up and was never used again. Evidence of the quarry operation abounds. The rock pier still has steel or iron spikes where the tug boats used to tie up. And large slabs of granite still have ridges in them from where they were cut.

“Opposite the island, on the Clark Island peninsula, even more granite was taken. Operations there continued until 1969, when a fire destroyed the building that housed all the tools for the operation.

“At the time the quarry was at its peak was in the late 1930s and 40s,” said Arnold Hocking. Thomaston. Hocking’s father was superintendent of the quarry during the 1940s. “About 300 men worked there and they shipped out about 1,500 tons of paving blocks by barge a day.” The island and quarry operations were owned by John Meehan & Sons out of New York and Philadelphia, Hocking said.

“Hocking and his brother took over the operation of the quarry until the fire destroyed everything. Granite had been taken from the area since the early 1900s, before the island was serviced by electricity, Hocking said, and everything was operated by steam or compressed air.

Historical evidence, beautiful scenery and solitude make Clark Island a worthwhile destination.