Embracing Mistakes

Happening, right now- UNEXPECTED EVENTS

“Fail boldly…..If you don’t mind failing, you’re never going to succeed—there will be nothing there to make you want more….Failing makes you see yourself as you truly are, and where you can take yourself.”  from:–>Why Dean Karnazes Is the Most Successful Runner On Earth | In Stride | OutsideOnline.com. While this Outside magazine article is mostly true, one caveat- a life punctuated by repeated failures is maybe not so good these days. I heard on the radio the other day part of a TED talk that described America right now as a country where everyone has an equal chance as we line up at the starting block of our ” race”, and at that brief moment, everyone is equal, anyone could win, or place well but as the race progresses we then are characterized as winners or losers. In America right now, it’s too dangerous to lag behind. Losers are castigated for not trying hard enough, for being too fat, or too lazy to make it to the podium.

Even so, I am surprised that I’m re-re-reading Improv Wisdom: Don’t Prepare, Just Show Up, a slim hardcover book that is one of only two books that I bought in the past year. (The re-re- is not a mistake) The book was first given to me to read by my friend and frequent mentor- Brad Purdy.  9781400081882_p0_v1_s260x420

A couple of years ago, I was in Tanglewood 4-H Camp’s kitchen, cooking for a group of 40 men, under Brad’s direction. Brad had placed posters with pages from the Imrov book around the kitchen. Me and the other sub-cooks learned lots from Brad- this time that there was more to cooking than reading the list of items and measurements in a recipe and mechanically creating tasty food.

Then and now, Brad encouraged us to feel fine about screwing up- he told us to embrace the mistake- announce it publicly and take a bow, even !

Even to the point of this—Mistakes may actually be blessings

Carey Kish: It’s time to step up to the 1,000-mile challenge | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

As part of a regimen for the 1,000-mile goal, include hiking time in Acadia National Park. With views like this, you’ll be invigorated in both body and mind. Carey Kish Photo

As part of a regimen for the 1,000-mile goal, include hiking time in Acadia National Park. With views like this, you’ll be invigorated in both body and mind.
Carey Kish Photo

Carey Kish’s idea is superb. I like the idea of setting a long term goal that requires bit of a stretch. Totally in the right direction, which is getting outside. It’s also Maine-based.

Hey, Carey, I’m on this bus! Maybe we can hike together sometime in this 2014 campaign. I vowed to stay close to home this year, and your plan is making me look forward to the next few months.
I’d like a third hike of the Hundred. Carey’s thru-hike of Baxter state park inspired me to do the same this coming August. And yes to Grafton Loop. Definitely will do a thru hike of the George’s Highland Path and all of Camden Hills State Park

Readers click here—>>Carey Kish: It’s time to step up to the 1,000-mile challenge | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram.

After the trail: The return of the existential despair

Occasionally I repost material written by others that I feel a connection with. Carrot Quinn has given us one of the best post-thru hike accounts of how it feels to stop walking after exercising 12 hours a day, for day after day, and months at a time.

photo by Carrot Quinn

photo by Carrot Quinn

It’s a bit long, but has good photos and deserves to be listened to.–> After the trail: The return of the existential despair.

I experienced some of this post hike depression in 2007 after I completed the AT. I was better after the 2010 PCT hike, and am almost back on track after completing the CDT this past September. I do have a great place to live, and a family and friends that love me.

It still feels feels selfish when I whine after being on “vacation” for 5-6 months a year, but thru hiking was definitely not a vacation. My MeGaTex buddies and I used to joke about how nice it would be to just be able to “camp” and walk a bit each day, but we were generally asleep after boiling up a pot of food, and staring at the campfire until the tiredness took us away into the darkness.

How To Live In A Heated Tent

Three buddies are heading up with me to the Jackman, Maine wilds next week for a five day winter camping trip.

Photo by Paul KIrtley

Read another superb blog post from UK’s Paul Kirtley, blogger, wilderness bushcraft instructor, and general expert in outdoor skills.

Paul’s blog entry has loads of info about how we will survive, in style.

Click it!  – How To Live In A Heated Tent.

2013 in review- Thanks to all my readers!

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

I appreciate all the contacts with my readers.  Even though I was not able to blog very often while I was off on my 5 month hike of the Continental Divide Trail, LOTS of people connected with me in 2013.  I pledge to try and bring my readers more interesting stuff .  Stay tuned!

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 33,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 12 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

My Favorite Books Read in 2013

Lists, lists, lists…

This time of year, it’s easy to scan countless columns of the best movies, best books.

I haven’t seen “Best Meals I’ve Cooked in 2013″, but there is a list for that, for sure.

I am tired of going to such lists online and then experiencing ads popping up in the middle.  Outside mag. is the worst offender, their content is generally great but they are killing me with their creeping advertising campaign.

Here are my one dozen best reads from 2013.    No ads.

Can't resist- Here's #1

Can’t resist- Here’s #1

Disclaimer:  I’m shooting you over to my Goodreads bookshelves via my blog.  You can see what I like, and then you can click on each book and get more details. I have reviewed most of them.  You can also friend me on Goodreads and then I can also see what you like to read and get more recommendations for like-minded folks.  Thanks to my hiker buddy Birdlegs for turning me on to Goodreads!

From Goodreads –> Tom Jamrog’s Favorite Books Read in 2013 .

Uncle Tom / Portland Press Herald

One should expect a lot of challenges over the course of a six-month backpacking journey, yes. But on the 3,200-mile long Continental Divide Trail, challenge takes on a whole new meaning.

Just ask Tom Jamrog of Lincolnville, who recently completed this epic five-month hike from Mexico to Canada through four states along the sinuous spine of the Rocky Mountains. With the AT and the PCT already under his hip belt, Jamrog has now joined a rather elite group of hikers who have achieved this Triple Crown feat.

Jamrog atop 14,440' Mt. Elbert, CO

Jamrog atop 14,440′ Mt. Elbert, CO

Kish’s complete article here –> Continental-sized challenges on the Continental Divide Trail | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram.