Lowest to Highest, a Backcountry Route From Badwater to Mt. Whitney, Part Five

I’ve been reporting the latest episodes from Carrot Quinn’s most excellent hiking blog. Here’s the most latest from her insane hike from the lowest to the highest points of the USA- all in California. Check out life in the sun- the real hot sun:

NotaChance

NotaChance overlooking Saline valley- photo by Carrot Quinn

Lowest to Highest, a Backcountry Route From Badwater to Mt. Whitney, Part Five- Inyo Mountains, Hikin Yo Trails | CARROT QUINN.

Missed Part 1 ? Check out my Triple Crown of Hiking TV interview

Somewhere in Southern California

Somewhere in Southern California

WCSH’s  Maine-based TV news magazine “207” interviewed me at my kitchen table two weeks ago.

If you were not able to watch the broadcast last night, the link to Part 1 of the interview is now up on WCSH’s web site.  <<-

The second half of the interview is Tonight, Tuesday, Nov. 28 at 7 PM.  Catch it at 7:00 p.m. on channels 6 in Portland and  2 in Bangor.

I’m talking adventure, about walking for months on end at a time, and what’s next after being awarded the Triple Crown of Hiking.

My interview will also be posted in the 207 section of www.WCSH6.com, where it will remain online for approximately 6 months.

I’d like to thank all the hundreds of hikers, neighbors, family members, and even those complete strangers who assisted me during my year and a half of backpacking.

The Last Great Walk- my book review

The Last Great Walk: The True Story of a 1909 Walk from New York to San Francisco, and Why it Matters TodayThe Last Great Walk: The True Story of a 1909 Walk from New York to San Francisco, and Why it Matters Today by Wayne Curtis
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This 2014 book gets 4 out of 5 stars.
It really held my interest. I found out about a popular cultural phenomenon of the late 19th century-American pedestrianism. During the 1870s and 1880s, America’s most popular spectator sport wasn’t baseball, or football—it was competitive walking. Inside sold-out arenas, competitors walked around dirt tracks almost nonstop for six straight days, risking their health and sanity to see who could walk the farthest—500 miles was standard.

This book is about the “final” mega-stroll of Edward Payson Weston, who, in 1909, walked across the USA on a bet that he could ambulate from coast to coast in 100 days or less, demanding an average of 40 miles a day. Weston was 70 years old when me took on the challenge. He was the best known of the competitive walkers. We join the taciturn Weston as he is mostly angered, but rarely dismayed about the unexpected pitfalls that he encountered through the Great Plains-over the Rockies, across some deserts, and often struggling through deep mud. The upside of his western journey were the massive crowds that greeted him as his highly publicized venture was big National news.

At the time, there were far fewer roads into the West. The automobile was just gaining momentum at the time, and tarred roads were unheard of outside the more populated Eastern seaboard. Weston often walked the newly established railroad system, and was challenged by navigational issues, deep sections of sticky mud, and downright nasty weather ( He left new your on a chilly March day).

The book’s back story is about the loss of walking as a viable means to getting about one’s local communities, as well as a highly interesting discussion about the medical, physical, and spiritual benefits that are gained from spending hours moving about the countryside, on our own two feet.

The book is very well written, and authored by Wayne Curtis, the Lowell Thomas Travel Journalist of the Year in 2002.

View all my reviews

Lowest to Highest, a Backcountry Route From Badwater to Mt. Whitney, Part Four- UFO | CARROT QUINN

Chance on Darwin Flats – photo by Carrot Quinn

I thought there were four entries about this trip, but there appear to be at least 5.  Here’s number 4, where our trio of badass babes of the West walk around in the night to saddle up to the approach on Mount Whitney, the highest mountain in the continental USA.  Warning: bad words, bad words…

Lowest to Highest, a Backcountry Route From Badwater to Mt. Whitney, Part Four- UFO | CARROT QUINN.

Lowest to Highest, a Backcountry Route From Badwater to Mt. Whitney, Part Three- Heat Exhaustion and Magical Desert Goldfish | CARROT QUINN

 

Me and Jess- photo by NotaChance

Me and Jess- photo by NotaChance

PART 3 ( out of  4).  The best backpacking writing in November 2014 is right here.

“But the endorphins of steep climbs are a thing without parallel, and that feeling you get upon reaching the top is a feeling, I am learning, to build one’s entire life around.”

Lowest to Highest, a Backcountry Route From Badwater to Mt. Whitney, Part Three- Heat Exhaustion and Magical Desert Goldfish | CARROT QUINN.

Lowest to Highest, a Backcountry Route from Badwater to Mt. Whitney, Part Two- Mystical Water Fortresses and an Unbound Freedom I Didn’t Know Existed | CARROT QUINN

Lowest to Highest, a Backcountry Route from Badwater to Mt. Whitney, Part Two- Mystical Water Fortresses and an Unbound Freedom I Didn’t Know Existed | CARROT QUINN<<–

NotAChance and Orbit- photo by Carrot Quinn

Part two becons.  She’s at it again.

Lowest to Highest, a Backcountry Route from Badwater to Mt. Whitney, Part One- Don’t Fear the Reaper

Three chicks in a desert- Carrot Quinn photo

She’s back at it again.

Check out Carrot Quinn’s three-part mini-series on a ridiculously tough microadventure from the lowest point to the highest in the USA, with all 165 miles in between.  Warning: bad words, and numerous behaviors that are considered unacceptable to mainstream America follows!

—>>>Lowest to Highest, a Backcountry Route from Badwater to Mt. Whitney, Part One- Don’t Fear the Reaper.