The Smoky Mountain Hiking Blog

tjamrog:

The marketing machine is ramping up again, this time for the Dec.5 release of Cheryl Strayed’s “Wild”, backpacking’s latest media opportunity.

However, there is another movie that I will travel anywhere to see- Let’s all hope for this other video project’s success. Grandma Gatewood is the real deal. To see the video clip, click on View Original. It made me cry.

Originally posted on Grandma (Emma) Gatewood:

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We were pleasantly surprised and pleased to see that a story about Emma Gatewood and a clip from our project were on the Smoky Mountain Blog here is an excerpt:

Who was Grandma Gatewood?
In 1955, after raising 11 children, Emma “Grandma” Gatewood became the first woman to solo thru-hike the Appalachian Trail – at the tender age of 67! In September of that year, having survived a rattlesnake strike, two hurricanes, and a run-in with gangsters from Harlem, she stood atop Maine’s Mount Katahdin.

Then, in 1960, she hiked it again, becoming the first person to hike the Appalachian Trail twice. And, just to prove those first two weren’t a fluke, she hiked it again in 1963 – at the age of 75! After that third adventure Emma became the first person to hike the 2,179-mile trail on three different occasions.

To read the rest and see the clip…

View original 3 more words

Breakdown — Andrew Skurka’s Week of Backpacking Food

In just over two weeks I will be heading up for my most anticipated adventure of 2014- a week of backpacking in Baxter State Park (BSP).  Three months ago, I was able to patch together a campsite reservation  that would enable me to start the trip with a summit climb up to Baxter Peak from the Chimney Pond side and then wind my way up through the northern and lesser reaches of the Park. If I make it to the top it will be number 17 .   My special thanks to Maine author and adventurer Carey Kish for his idea of ” a thru-hike” of BSP.

I think a lot of Andrew Skurka. His book ( below) is a valuable read.  It’s the real deal. I learn each time I read it, but can’t find it tonight.  If I have lent it out to you, let me know !

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The recent post on Skurka’s website about his own food prep has inspired me to get out my own postal scale and be a bit more thoughtful about my food choices for that week. I’ve been able to keep off almost 10 pound of my usual winter weight, and want to keep it that way.  Too often we sweat up a workout and then cancel any likelihood of some fat trimming by gorging on a calorie-laden “energy drink” , or those barely disguised candy bars.

Skurka's scale and his fuel

Backpacking is the secret weight loss program that the world doesn’t care for or want to know about.  It’s hard especially in Maine, and particularly in Baxter where the elevation opportunities abound.  I’ve met more than a handful of guys on my trail travels who regularly take a full month off every season to backpack a segment of a National Scenic Trail to lose weight (and to have adventures).  This year, I was down to Tennessee/ North Carolina to hike a week on the AT.  Most of the thru-hikers that I met there had been on the trail for a month or so. At least a half a dozen men told me they had already lost 20 pounds.

Check out a very thoughtful meal plan for your own adventure- I like the fact that  Skurka cooks a daily evening meal and carries a stove, my own practice.

Read  Skurka’s excellent article here>>>.Breakdown — A Week of Food

Top Ten Hiking Tips From the Woman Who Hiked the AT Faster Than Anyone – Beyond the Edge

Photograph by Christoffer Sjostrom

Photograph by Christoffer Sjostrom

Top Ten Hiking Tips From the Woman Who Hiked the AT Faster Than Anyone – Beyond the Edge.

Excellent points, from Jennifer Pfarr Davis ( “Odessa”) , who was awarded Outside Magazine’s Adventurer of the year Award in 2012 for her record breaking hike of the Appalachian Trail.   Her 47 mile a day pace suggests that one might pay attention to her recommendations.  I’ve not seen tip #6  elsewhere on these types of lists — to personalize your hike, by incorporating your off-trail interests into your hiking adventure. For example, if you like to read, bring a book.

For those of us who use electronics like a smartphones or a Steripen , I  agree on the use of small battery pack rather than the often frustrating solar charger.  I love my 4 oz. Anker 5600 mAh external battery.

In a related story, the self-supported record for the Pacific Crest Trail was just broken in 2013 ( 60 days, 17 hours)  by another woman -Heather Anderson ( “Anish”) . The August 2014 Backpacker magazine has an excellent article about her and her hike, entitled A Ghost Among Us.

 

Anker Astro 5600mAh External Battery
Anker Astro 5600mAh External Battery
Anker Astro 5600mAh External Battery
Anker Astro 5600mAh External Battery

 

What’s Your “Fitness Age”? – 2014 version

The first “fitness calculator” I learned about was Dr. Oz’s Real Age.  It became popular several years ago.  Real Age is an online calculator that is based on the results of answering questions about 125 factors related to a person’s overall health, including health, feelings, diet, and fitness ( i.e., How often you eat fish versus red meat to exercise and sleep habits, asthma, smoking, aspirin use, cancer history, parental longevity, and conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes.). I took it once but didn’t get too worked up over using it more than once, even though my ” real age” was about 10 years younger than my actual age.

Now there appears to be a much briefer method of determining your relative fitness that is based on just 5 factors.

This 2013 study, from the  Norwegian University of Science and Technology,  reveals a more efficient, low-tech means of precisely assessing how well your body functions physically. It culminated in each of the 5,000 participants in taking a treadmill test assessing peak oxygen intake (VO2 max), or how well the body delivers oxygen to its cells. From the study, “VO2 max has been shown in large-scale studies to closely correlate with significantly augmented life spans, even among the elderly or overweight. In other words, VO2 max can indicate fitness age.”

The real value of this study is it’s apparent ability to establish one’s own VO2 max without the cost and inconvenience of paying for the medical procedure.  The researchers found that  just five measurements — waist circumference; resting heart rate; frequency and intensity of exercise; age; and sex — into an algorithm allowed them to predict a person’s VO2 max with noteworthy accuracy, according to their study, published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise

The researchers have used all of this data to create a free online calculator that allows you to determine your VO2 max without going to a lab. All you need to establish is your waist measurement and your resting heart rate.  You plug these numbers, along with your age, sex and frequency and intensity of exercise, into the calculator, and you’ll learn your fitness age.

From the NYTime article, “The results can be sobering. A 50-year-old man, for instance, who exercises moderately a few times a week, sports a 36-inch waist and a resting heart rate of 75 — not atypical values for healthy middle-aged men — will have a fitness age of 59. Thankfully, unwanted fitness years, unlike the chronological kind, can be erased, Dr. Wisloff says. Exercise more frequently or more intensely. Then replug your numbers and exult as your “age” declines. A youthful fitness age, Dr. Wisloff says, ‘is the single best predictor of current and future health’.”

I have been recording my heart rate on a daily basis for the past two months with an iPhone app called Cardiio .

Cardiio app on iPhone 5s

Cardiio app on iPhone 5s

While there are manual methods that don’t rely on a watch, the program’s charting features give you the ability to aggregate and share data. I  sent the summary results to my doctor, as I am concerned about my occasional heart rate drops into the high 30’s.  While heart rate is one of the five measurements in the Norwegian study that drove my “fitness age” to 38, I want to stick around to enjoy my fitness.

She referred me to a local sport-aware cardiologist for a screening after my own office EKG results were normal.  I’ll keep you posted, but in the meantime, I’m going to try and drop another inch off my waist line, continue hammering the backpacking and bicycling, and doing my TM twice daily, which I feel has resulted in a decreased resting heart rate after practicing it twice daily for 42 years.

What’s Your ‘Fitness Age’?. <<- click here for full New York Times article.

 

 

 

My Book Review- Grandma Gatewood’s Walk: The Inspiring Story of the Woman Who Saved the Appalachian Trail

Grandma Gatewood's Walk: The Inspiring Story of the Woman Who Saved the Appalachian TrailGrandma Gatewood’s Walk: The Inspiring Story of the Woman Who Saved the Appalachian Trail by Ben Montgomery
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Grandma Gatewood broke the mold. The first woman to solo thru-hike the AT in 1957, she went on to walk the AT two more times, the last at 75 years old. She was also the first person to thru hike the AT three times. This was all accomplished with no money to speak off. The $57 a month she was receiving from Social Security at that time was all she would need.
Spoiler: stop right here if you don’t want me telling you details that I learned from this book, a 2014 release. Hell, it’s a book review. I am going to write what I want. Your choice.
This story is not about backpacking, because Grandma Gatewood never wore one. She probably couldn’t afford to buy one if she did. Even so, she might have declined to use a 1957 model, as it would have been too heavy for her to want to carry. The word iconoclast fits her to a “t”. Instead, she carried her spartan kit in a homemade bag slung over one shoulder. No boots, tent, sleeping bag or pad, stove for her, just Keds sneakers and carrying an army blanket to wrap up in, a plastic shower curtain for shelter, a cup, first aid kit, raincoat, and one change of clothes. That’s it ! Her food was no-cook high calorie stuff- dried beef, cheese, and nuts, supplemented by any wild food she was able to forage.
The AT is known for hardships: humidity, steep climbs, rattlesnakes down south, and periods of relentless rain. While the typical AT thru-hiker reports are all about the hike and how tough it is. For Gatewood, a thru-hike of the AT would have been a respite from the brutal life she led for her first 67 years. She married young to a bastard of an individual, who sexually and physically abused her on what appears to have been a daily basis, resulting in 11 children, 23 grandchildren, and a work day on the farm that would have crippled lesser folks.
Gatewood’s chance read of an old National Geographic article planted a seed in her heart that would not make growth until her last child was independent. When that happened, she just walked out of the house, without telling a soul where she was going.
She had to learn new skills, and really fast.
You may cry when you read this book, it is so well written and genuine.
While reading present articles about Gatewood, I learned that there is a movie about her that is currently in production ( http://grandmagatewood.wordpress.com/… ). This is one story that needs to be heard, a genuine American epic of a life saved and even graced by the open trail.

View all my reviews

Grandma Gatewood’s Walk: The Woman Who Saved the Appalachian Trail | Longreads

I am still benefitting from my most enjoyable, 5 day walk on the Appalachian Trail in North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.  The cool temps, abundant wildflowers, word-class terrain, challenging climbs, fragrant forests,  plentiful water sources, and the top-notch Kincora hostel all contributed to an experience that continues to enrich me, as I reminisce daily about that ancient path and the effect it had in uplifting my spirits.

In 1955, a most amazing story began to unfold, when a tiny, aged woman laced up her Keds and started walking from Mt. Oglethorpe, Georgia.  Grandma Gatewood’s story needs to be heard today, when the complexity of one’s life begs for simplification.

This week’s Longreads Member’s Pick is the the opening chapter of Grandma Gatewood’s Walk, the new book by Ben Montgomery about Emma Gatewood, the first woman to hike the entire Appalachian Trail alone—and who did so at the age of 67.  I  opened the following link and ordered the book after reading the introductory chapter.  It is so well written.  Check it out:—>>Grandma Gatewood’s Walk: The Woman Who Saved the Appalachian Trail | Longreads.