TD’12 Race- Where’s Andy Hazen?

I DK, no one does.

It appears that Andy’s Spot device has not transmitted properly since 6/9/ AM ( yesterday), so we don’t know where he is right now.  You can’t call him, and he can’t call us right now, but we know that at last report, he was in the middle of the pack.

Updates and discussions about the race are on on the Bikepacking.com list serve that one can follow. TD’12 Race Discussion. <<–Click this link to get there, and view three pics from what looks like Elk Pass.  Andy had told me that he pushed his bike 4 miles through the snow on his ride up to Banff, so he is familiar with the whole route up through the US Border.

One pic reflects the fresh snow that fell there yesterday.

Morning on this year’s Tour Divide

Go Andy!

Ride the Divide DVD- now via Netflix

On June 8th, this astounding yearly  race begins again.  I just found out that the DVD is now available from Netflix, either as a physical in-the mail- DVD, or as an Instant download format.

DVD cover

Appleton Ridge’s  Stephen Gleasner completed the race in 2008.  This year, my next door neighbor, Andy Hazen, is planning to be the second rider from Maine to finish as well.  Starting in Banff, Canada, and ending at the U.S.-Mexico border, the Great Divide mountain bike race extends 2,700 miles along the Continental Divide. This scenic documentary follows three determined cyclists, from the 2008 race,  attempting the grueling ride.

Gleasner appears in the pack at the start.  He has also written a story about his experience in the excellent short story “Chasing Mary” in Cordillera- Literature from the World’s Toughest Bike Race.

via Netflix: Ride the Divide.

FSTPKR: Human power from Reno to the Bering Sea

FSTPKR: BLC to the Bering Sea.—-< Click. Now!
You absolutely have to check out what Krudmeister is up to this season. It is practically inconceivable to me that someone has both the interest and the skills to undertake a solo excursion that combines bicycling to Alaska from Reno, then backpacking the Chilkoot Trail out of Skagway, then assembling a kayak and following traversing the length of the Yukon River, all the way to the Bering Sea! What is even more inconceivable is that in this day and age, there will probably be no one who will read about Krud’s adventure in the sport section of a newspaper, where we are exposed to the daily whining of multimillion dollar base and basketball stars.
Krud is one of my virtual friends. He figured into a couple of my gear acquisitions.  I came to know  him when he and Scott Williamson broke the Pacific Crest Trail Speed record, I think in 2006.  I went to my local Patagonia outlet and showed them his blog. He was and maybe still is a Patagonia customer service employee.  He was trumping up their Houdini jacket, and one of the employees gave me one, that I used on my PCT and Long Trail thru hikes. It is still as good as new.

Then he posted a picture of some wildly garish New Balance shoes that I tracked down through my brother Roy, who works for the company. They are a product that is sold in Japan.
I though of Krudmeister yesterday when I was aglow with the shoes on my birthday.
Krud, want a pair to wear when you get back?

Not Turning Back Can Kill You

Reposting  a most excellent entry from our brethren in the kayaking school of adventure. The content is Labrador-related and references “the book” that got me and Alan MacKinnon into Labrador way back when.

Here’s the teaser:  “Their story has lessons for all of us who venture into the unknown, whether it be taking a back road to cut across town, guessing left at a fork in a hiking trail, or guessing right at a confluence of two rivers.  Their refusal to turn back, despite mounting evidence that they had taken a “wrong turn” followed stages many of us are familiar with.”

News Flash: Map & Territory Not Same | Waterlines — A Maine Sea Kayaking Journal.

An Inuit Builder Crafts His Last Canoe : NPR

An Inuit Builder Crafts His Last Canoe  by Emma Jacobs

via An Inuit Builder Crafts His Last Canoe : NPR.

Joe was the native guide on a 200 mile canoe trip I took on the Grand River in Labrador several years ago. He was the kindest, most humble, and most knowledgeable outdoors man I have ever met.  Joe, and especially his brother Horace, are probably the last of the line to possess the encyclopedia of skills that encompass trapping, bush survival skills, hunting, and survival in the harshest environment I have ever traversed.  For a glimpse of this life, read Rugge and Davidson’ Great Heart, now back in print.  I consider Great Heart a treasure of a read, one that I have enjoyed several times.  The book inspired my own motorcycle trip to Labrador in 1993, when my friend Alan MacKinnon and I were the among the first motorcyclists to traverse the newly constructed gravel-and-sand Trans Labrador Highway. The mosquitoes there were so bad that nothing I have encountered since seems too bad, including a month in Alaska and 6 months on the PCT.

AT- Day 7

AT -Day 7
Tremendous thunder and lightening storm last night. To the degree that two storms blasted the ridge last night. One at 10:30 PM and another at 3 AM. There was only one other time In my life that I’ve heard such explosive thunder and non stop stroboscopic lightening.
In the midst if the wind and rain, a gigantic tree crashed to the ground right at the campsite I was initially worried that it crushed Johnny Walker, who was hammoc camping over there, but it missed him. I had never spent such a night in my new tent, The Moment. It fared well, kept me dry, although it never got terribly windy and tried to blow sideways under the vents.
“I was hiking with one of you guys,” said Johnny Walker, while we were hiking today. What he meant was a school psychologist, and who he meant was Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, a school psychologist from New Hampshire that I am friendly with. They both started hiking together from Springer this season, but Chronic had to return home for personal business, of some sort of emergency situation.
I knew today was my last day of backpacking hiking for a while. I let myself settle into an appreciation of the act of walking, the fact that I was dry and warm, and that I have a life where I can get outside, sleep on the ground, decide where to lay down and fall asleep for the night, and eat what I have carried on my back.

20110511-071259.jpg

AT- Day 7

AT -Day 7
Tremendous thunder and lightening storm last night. To the degree that two storms blasted the ridge last night. One at 10:30 PM and another at 3 AM. There was only one other time In my life that I’ve heard such explosive thunder and non stop stroboscopic lightening.
In the midst if the wind and rain, a gigantic tree crashed to the ground right at the campsite I was initially worried that it crushed Johnny Walker, who was hammoc camping over there, but it missed him. I had never spent such a night in my new tent, The Moment. It fared well, kept me dry, although it never got terribly windy and tried to blow sideways under the vents.
“I was hiking with one of you guys,” said Johnny Walker, while we were hiking today. What he meant was a school psychologist, and who he meant was Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, a school psychologist from New Hampshire that I am friendly with. They both started hiking together from Springer this season, but Chronic had to return home for personal business, of some sort of emergency situation.
I knew today was my last day of backpacking hiking for a while. I let myself settle into an appreciation of the act of walking, the fact that I was dry and warm, and that I have a life where I can get outside, sleep on the ground, decide where to lay down and fall asleep for the night, and eat what I have carried on my back.

20110511-071259.jpg