Go Take a Hike! – NYTimes.com

Go Take a Hike! – NYTimes.com.<  Enjoy the hope.

Every once in a while, Nick Kristof, prizewinning journalist takes a long hike, and it’s national news. This time it’s 145 miles in Oregon on the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT).  Kristof’s article calls to mind one of the most piercing quotes of all time, from the Grand Wanderer.

“However mean your life is, meet it and live it; do not shun it and call it hard names. It looks poorest when you are richest.  The fault finder will find faults even in paradise.  Love your life, poor as it is.  You may perhaps have some pleasant, thrilling, glorious hours, even in a poorhouse.  The setting sun is reflected from the windows of the almshouse as brightly as from the rich man’s abode; the snow melts before its door as early in the spring. ”                                                                     -Thoreau

In 2010, on this exact date, I was 1544 miles into hiking the PCT, and in Etna California, about 100 miles south of entering Oregon.

Me entering the Trinity Alps

Me entering the Trinity Alps

Read my Trailjournal entry from that day, echoing my own renewed appreciation for hiking this particular National Scenic Trail.

Breakdown — Andrew Skurka’s Week of Backpacking Food

In just over two weeks I will be heading up for my most anticipated adventure of 2014- a week of backpacking in Baxter State Park (BSP).  Three months ago, I was able to patch together a campsite reservation  that would enable me to start the trip with a summit climb up to Baxter Peak from the Chimney Pond side and then wind my way up through the northern and lesser reaches of the Park. If I make it to the top it will be number 17 .   My special thanks to Maine author and adventurer Carey Kish for his idea of ” a thru-hike” of BSP.

I think a lot of Andrew Skurka. His book ( below) is a valuable read.  It’s the real deal. I learn each time I read it, but can’t find it tonight.  If I have lent it out to you, let me know !

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The recent post on Skurka’s website about his own food prep has inspired me to get out my own postal scale and be a bit more thoughtful about my food choices for that week. I’ve been able to keep off almost 10 pound of my usual winter weight, and want to keep it that way.  Too often we sweat up a workout and then cancel any likelihood of some fat trimming by gorging on a calorie-laden “energy drink” , or those barely disguised candy bars.

Skurka's scale and his fuel

Backpacking is the secret weight loss program that the world doesn’t care for or want to know about.  It’s hard especially in Maine, and particularly in Baxter where the elevation opportunities abound.  I’ve met more than a handful of guys on my trail travels who regularly take a full month off every season to backpack a segment of a National Scenic Trail to lose weight (and to have adventures).  This year, I was down to Tennessee/ North Carolina to hike a week on the AT.  Most of the thru-hikers that I met there had been on the trail for a month or so. At least a half a dozen men told me they had already lost 20 pounds.

Check out a very thoughtful meal plan for your own adventure- I like the fact that  Skurka cooks a daily evening meal and carries a stove, my own practice.

Read  Skurka’s excellent article here>>>.Breakdown — A Week of Food

Baxter’s Traveler Loop hike

In two weeks, I depart for a week long backpacking transect of Maine’s Baxter State Park, where one of the days will be spent on this tough loop hike. I have done it once before, we’ll see how it goes this time. I remember it was a dry route, so I’ll  pack extra water, and a flashlight!

photo by Bridget Besaw

Maine: Hike and Canoe Baxter State Park. –from Beyond the Edge: National Geographic Adventure Blog, originally posted by Chris Kassar on July 30, 2014,

Walk one of the park’s newest, toughest trails, then enjoy an easy lake paddle.

What Is It? Looking to get off the beaten path and avoid the crowds in one of Maine’s most heavily visited state parks? Try the Traveler Mountain Loop. It’s a lung-busting, 10.6-mile circuit that includes three separate mountain summits and climbs over 3,700 feet in total. You’ll spend two-thirds of your time above tree line, which means striking views but also rapidly changing weather, so be prepared.

Why Do It? Baxter State Park is an exquisite treasure in a state known for its beauty. The Traveler Mountain loop hike—which tops out on Peak of the Ridges, Traveler Mountain, and North Traveler Mountain—rivals the popular Katahdin climb in vistas and difficulty. But it’s on the north side of the park, so you’ll likely experience solitude. Reward your intense effort with an easy paddle on a serene lake the next day, and keep an eye out for moose.

Make It Happen: Visit Baxter State Park’s site for maps, conditions, and information.

 

 

The Workout – Video

I really like the looks of this workout .  I plan to take some of the exercises and work it up.  Great time to do it right now, with the full bloom of summer in Maine beckoning me to be outside. I Don’t miss the YMCA gym at all! 

The Workout | Becoming Rocky Balboa – Video – NYTimes.com.–<  Open up the brief video!  I’m not sure we’d get such a crowd up here.

How to get into ultralight backpacking

Lightening your backpacking load can have dramatic implications, particularly for aging hikers who have followed the techniques in Colin Fletcher’s “Complete Walker” hiking bible.

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    Last summer, when I was hitchhiking in Colorado, I met a 63 year old hiker who gave me a ride. He taught a course on Ultralight Backpacking at the local college. Bob said that the easiest way is go ultralight was to scrape up $1250, go to the zpacks.com website, and order their most popular cuben fiber pack, solo tent, and down sleeping bag.  This gets the “Big Three” on your back for total weight of three pounds. Expensive, but efficient.
For the rest of us, it’s best to start with keeping the big 3 under 10 pounds, which would lead to a fully loaded backpack of 15-20 pounds if you leave that Rambo knife at home.
Once you have cut the weight on your Big 3, you enter the “ we pack for our fear” zone.  Anxiety about what might go wrong on a hike may lead to placement of unnecessary items in that light pack.  For example, I once saw another backpacker pull a cast iron two foot long lawnmower blade from his pack and place it by the side of his sleeping bag at bedtime.  I asked him about it and he said, “ Wild hogs here in Georgia can attack you when you sleep.”  I used to carry a heavy ankle brace, “just in case” , but after lugging around-unused for 3,700 miles I now leave it at home.
I hike with three pair of thin socks, two for walking in, one for sleeping. Ultralight hikers don’t generally carry spare clothing like underwear.  Some give up long pants in the warmer weather, adding thin wool tights and rain pants if it gets too cold.
Another popular option to ditch weight is to go stoveless, and forget the cooking pot as well, opting for foods that don’t require cooking, or that can be rehydrated with water in a plastic container.
A Katadyne-type pump filter for water purification is not a typically in an ultralight pack- instead we see the Aqua Mira solution, or a Sawyer Squeeze gravity system.
The best resource for a quick lesson in learning about ultra and lightweight backpacking is the book “Lighten Up ! A Complete Handbook for Light and Ultralight Backpacking” by Don Ladigin. It’s inexpensive and filled with all you need to know. 51VeNaJAHsL._AA160_
Of course if you have $1250 bucks, you can get there quickly, but I would rather take that amount and use the money for a one- month backpacking trip.

Top Ten Hiking Tips From the Woman Who Hiked the AT Faster Than Anyone – Beyond the Edge

Photograph by Christoffer Sjostrom

Photograph by Christoffer Sjostrom

Top Ten Hiking Tips From the Woman Who Hiked the AT Faster Than Anyone – Beyond the Edge.

Excellent points, from Jennifer Pfarr Davis ( “Odessa”) , who was awarded Outside Magazine’s Adventurer of the year Award in 2012 for her record breaking hike of the Appalachian Trail.   Her 47 mile a day pace suggests that one might pay attention to her recommendations.  I’ve not seen tip #6  elsewhere on these types of lists — to personalize your hike, by incorporating your off-trail interests into your hiking adventure. For example, if you like to read, bring a book.

For those of us who use electronics like a smartphones or a Steripen , I  agree on the use of small battery pack rather than the often frustrating solar charger.  I love my 4 oz. Anker 5600 mAh external battery.

In a related story, the self-supported record for the Pacific Crest Trail was just broken in 2013 ( 60 days, 17 hours)  by another woman -Heather Anderson ( “Anish”) . The August 2014 Backpacker magazine has an excellent article about her and her hike, entitled A Ghost Among Us.

 

Anker Astro 5600mAh External Battery
Anker Astro 5600mAh External Battery
Anker Astro 5600mAh External Battery
Anker Astro 5600mAh External Battery

 

What’s Your “Fitness Age”? – 2014 version

The first “fitness calculator” I learned about was Dr. Oz’s Real Age.  It became popular several years ago.  Real Age is an online calculator that is based on the results of answering questions about 125 factors related to a person’s overall health, including health, feelings, diet, and fitness ( i.e., How often you eat fish versus red meat to exercise and sleep habits, asthma, smoking, aspirin use, cancer history, parental longevity, and conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes.). I took it once but didn’t get too worked up over using it more than once, even though my ” real age” was about 10 years younger than my actual age.

Now there appears to be a much briefer method of determining your relative fitness that is based on just 5 factors.

This 2013 study, from the  Norwegian University of Science and Technology,  reveals a more efficient, low-tech means of precisely assessing how well your body functions physically. It culminated in each of the 5,000 participants in taking a treadmill test assessing peak oxygen intake (VO2 max), or how well the body delivers oxygen to its cells. From the study, “VO2 max has been shown in large-scale studies to closely correlate with significantly augmented life spans, even among the elderly or overweight. In other words, VO2 max can indicate fitness age.”

The real value of this study is it’s apparent ability to establish one’s own VO2 max without the cost and inconvenience of paying for the medical procedure.  The researchers found that  just five measurements — waist circumference; resting heart rate; frequency and intensity of exercise; age; and sex — into an algorithm allowed them to predict a person’s VO2 max with noteworthy accuracy, according to their study, published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise

The researchers have used all of this data to create a free online calculator that allows you to determine your VO2 max without going to a lab. All you need to establish is your waist measurement and your resting heart rate.  You plug these numbers, along with your age, sex and frequency and intensity of exercise, into the calculator, and you’ll learn your fitness age.

From the NYTime article, “The results can be sobering. A 50-year-old man, for instance, who exercises moderately a few times a week, sports a 36-inch waist and a resting heart rate of 75 — not atypical values for healthy middle-aged men — will have a fitness age of 59. Thankfully, unwanted fitness years, unlike the chronological kind, can be erased, Dr. Wisloff says. Exercise more frequently or more intensely. Then replug your numbers and exult as your “age” declines. A youthful fitness age, Dr. Wisloff says, ‘is the single best predictor of current and future health’.”

I have been recording my heart rate on a daily basis for the past two months with an iPhone app called Cardiio .

Cardiio app on iPhone 5s

Cardiio app on iPhone 5s

While there are manual methods that don’t rely on a watch, the program’s charting features give you the ability to aggregate and share data. I  sent the summary results to my doctor, as I am concerned about my occasional heart rate drops into the high 30’s.  While heart rate is one of the five measurements in the Norwegian study that drove my “fitness age” to 38, I want to stick around to enjoy my fitness.

She referred me to a local sport-aware cardiologist for a screening after my own office EKG results were normal.  I’ll keep you posted, but in the meantime, I’m going to try and drop another inch off my waist line, continue hammering the backpacking and bicycling, and doing my TM twice daily, which I feel has resulted in a decreased resting heart rate after practicing it twice daily for 42 years.

What’s Your ‘Fitness Age’?. <<- click here for full New York Times article.